CULTIVATE NOT REPLICATE

When was the last time you had a hair-brained idea? You just wanted to create something so you hopped on the Internet to search for ideas on how to create it! It’s so easy to search the Internet for inspiration on how to create, but instead of actually creating, we often just replicate something already created. With Internet and DIY on the rise, it’s harder for us to design on our own. It is easier for us to replicate what already is. We take their ideas and recreate, sometimes adapting with our own flare. While this is not necessarily a bad habit, it’s a limiting one.

Replicate is not the same as to cultivate.

We may replicate a form of cultivation—but even a farmer plowing the same field will not be able to recreate the exact methods that he used previously, he has to consider the weather, changing environmental elements, his differing crop, etc. To cultivate means: to prepare, use, acquire, and develop! Just as a farmer has to start fresh every year to cultivate his land, we should desire to expand our thinking to cultivate new thoughts.

They say: there is no point in trying to reinvent the wheel, but if no one considered it, we’d all still be rolling things on rocks, or riding in covered wagons… If no one thought outside the box everyone would still be driving everywhere, no one would be flying. It took someone who thought: instead of trying to make a better wheel, how about we skip wheels altogether!

We have grown accustomed to replicating, because it is easy. I believe that when we replicate, we can hinder the dreaming and limit our potential. In Psalms 144:9, King David said, “God, I will sing a new song to You; I will play on a ten-stringed harp for You” (HCSB). David did not say that he would just sing and play the same songs over and over again (just replicating them repetitively), but that he was going to sing a new song (to cultivate something new as the Lord worked new things in his heart).

In our creating, we should desire to cultivate something new; we need to start by dreaming. Try designing before you go looking at what other individuals have already created. Try limiting your resources. When we create stage layouts, instead of using every light that we own, we can challenge ourselves to create an atmosphere with less. It forces us to plan before we build.

So, the idea that I challenge you with is to cultivate, not just replicate.

The next time you get a hair-brained idea to write a song, build a stage set, build something out of pallets, etc., instead of first running to the internet for ideas, try to imagine what will it take for you to cultivate an original piece of art that was inspired by your own imagination. Break down all limits and see how God can pave a new way through you!